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The people who make the best carers are those who are genuinely interested in the well-being and welfare of those around them. Care skills can be taught with training, but personality and compassion are my natural characteristics. One of the big appeals of staying at home instead of going into a residential home is that you have control over what you eat and when. Therefore it is really important that carers are able to cook, understand British cuisine and follow recipes. Food is one of life’s greatest pleasures and we need to be able to share this with our clients. Our clients need to understand their carers and know that they are going to be understood. A full driving license and the confidence to drive in the UK are also very important. Being able to drive your client to appointments, or to visit friends and family or to go out for the day will mean that both they and you will have fun and share new and exciting experiences.

Though I am not a carer by profession I have a lot of caring experience taking caring of people in need around me (friends, family and as a volunteer) with Down syndrome, dementia, poliomyelitis etc. The people who make the best carers are those who are genuinely interested in the well-being and welfare of those around them. Care skills can be taught with training, but personality and compassion are my natural characteristics. I am passionate and reliable carer to work in a variety of settings from learning disabilities, complex needs, physical disabilities, mental health and elderly. Assisting with Personal Care, including showering, shaving, oral care, skin care, toileting (including management of bladder & bowels), dressing, and hair care, enabling mobility, including daily stretching exercises, moving & Handling transfers, e.g. standing transfers, support with slide board or hoist as required, checking of specialist equipment e.g. charging electric wheelchair, driving of ramp adapted vehicle, as directed. Assistance with menu planning, preparing, cooking and serving varied healthy meals. Assist with medications, including eye medications, as prescribed by medical team. Day to day household tasks e.g. changing beds, laundry, ironing, food shopping in store & online. Support to fulfill activities of daily living e.g. working, leisure, education, shopping. Maintaining and enabling access to the local and wider community. Assistance to attend medical appointments and note taking during the appointment. Liaise with Healthcare Professionals, and family, when appropriate.

A caring and compassionate attitude. I have willingness to undertake qualification NVQ 2/3 in Health and Social Care and medication administration training. Effective written and verbal communication skills. Able to work flexible hours. What I mean is that though I am not a carer by profession I have a lot of caring experience taking caring of people in need me around me (friends and family) with Down syndrome, dementia, poliomyelitis etc. The people who make the best carers are those who are genuinely interested in the well-being and welfare of those around them. Care skills can be taught with training, but personality and compassion are my natural characteristics. No matter how much experience they have, really good carers share certain characteristics. Kindness, empathy and respect are essential. There are no formal age restrictions to becoming a carer, but most clients get on best with people who have some life experience behind them. A mature, responsible attitude is obviously vital. You should also be physically fit and healthy, because you’ll be helping clients with their mobility and balance, and are likely to be working long hours for two weeks at a time.


There are many vulnerable people in society who require partial or round-the-clock care. Working in the care profession is unquestionably hard work, with many carers dealing with concerns that most people wouldn’t like to contemplate. But a good carer can make all the difference to someone’s quality of life. Sometimes your family member or friend could need help suddenly – for example if they’ve had a stroke. Other times, it’s a gradual process with physical and/or mental changes slowly making it harder for them to care for themselves. When news comes suddenly that your family member or friend has been diagnosed with a serious health problem, it’s not uncommon to feel shocked and stressed at the prospect of becoming a carer, especially if you’ve never been in a caring role. Some people who have suddenly become carers have described feelings of helplessness, anxiety, sadness and fear of the unknown.

To be a carer you must have a good knowledge of the welfare system, as well as an understanding of the law. However, this knowledge can be acquired on the job as, in most cases; you won’t actually need any formal qualifications to start working as a carer. This means that a career as a carer is open to many people who have previously not had the appropriate qualifications for a job, or have been out of employment for long periods of time. Experience counts for a lot, and there are many examples of experience being used in place of formal qualifications to gain access to college or degree courses.
You can also train and develop your skills on the job, as many schemes will allow for day release training courses, as well as part-time college courses.

Working as a carer, you will be responsible for the whole life of another human being who isn't able to look after him/herself due to her/his illness or condition. Medication, food hygiene and personal hygiene are some of the things that need to be taken seriously. You will also need to be organised and efficient. Being disorganised will help neither you, nor your client. In most aspects of the job, the best quality a carer can have is patience. Being patient and giving the client your understanding, perhaps when his or her behaviour challenges you, is one of a good carer’s key skills. The fundamental attributes of a good carer are:

Professionalism at all the times
Patience
Being a good listener
Companionship
Medication assistance and monitoring
Assistance with correspondence and letter writing
General housekeeping
Keeping the agency informed of any changes
Laundry, washing and ironing
Shopping and cooking
Helping with personal care
Client confidentiality
Helping clients in and out of bed using hoists or other equipment



Live In Care Experience: 6+ Yrs. Yrs

General Care Experience: Home Care, Other Care Work, Care for close relative or loved one

Gender: Male

Looking for work in the following Locations:
Nationwide

Other Information

English Language Level: Advanced

Driving Licence: Full License - I don't have my own car

Care Qualifications: Occupational Therapy

Care Skills: Cancer, Children / Young People, End of life / Palliative Care, Learning Disability, Manual Handling, Multiple Sclerosis, Personal Care

Current DBS: No

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